Moles/Cysts removal

Moles, Cysts Treatment

Cysts

You or someone you know has probably had some kind of cyst. In many cases, a person will have a cyst, not realize what it is, and then ignore it because it’s not bothering them at the moment. But this can turn a minor issue into a larger, chronic problem.

The Most Common Type of Cyst

Different types of cysts occur in different parts of the body for different reasons, so it’s important to have a general understanding of cysts and, if you notice one developing, have it checked by a specialist.

The most common type of cyst is a sebaceous cyst. Think of a cyst as a balloon with the opening at the top on the outside of the skin. The skin on the inside that lines the balloon is producing skin cells.

Instead of those skin cells falling off into the atmosphere, the cells become trapped in the balloon. The balloon grows as it becomes filled with skin cells. The balloon may even rupture, which causes the cyst to become painful.

Essentially, a cyst is a ball of skin cells that are trapped underneath the skin.

Moles

Moles are common. Almost every adult has a few moles. Adults who have light skin often have more moles. They may have 10 to 40 moles on their skin. This is normal.

You should not be overly worried about your moles. But you should know:

  • A type of skin cancer, melanoma, can grow in or near a mole.
  • Caught early and treated, melanoma can be cured.
  • The first sign of melanoma is often a change to a mole — or a new mole on your skin.
  • Checking your skin can help you find melanoma early. A dermatologist can show you how to examine your skin and tell you how often you should check your skin.
Moles in children: What parents should know

Moles on a young child’s skin are generally nothing to worry about. It is normal for new moles to appear during childhood and adolescence. Moles will grow as the child grows. Some moles will darken, and others will lighten. These changes are expected in children and seldom a sign of melanoma — a type of skin cancer that can begin in a mole.

People often want to know how they can tell a mole from a melanoma. Here is a general rule.

Mole

A mole on your body has these traits:

  • 1 color – Often brown, but a mole can be tan, black, red, pink, blue, skin-toned, or colorless.
  • Round in shape.
  • Flat or slightly raised.
  • Looks the same from month to month.

Your moles may not look alike. Even in the same person, moles can differ in size, shape, or color. Moles can have hair. Some moles will change slowly over time, possibly even disappearing.

Moles can appear anywhere on the skin. Moles develop on the scalp, between the fingers and toes, on the soles and palms, and even under the nails.

Melanoma

If you see a mole or new spot on your skin that has any of the ABCDEs of melanoma, see a dermatologist immediately.